Richard A. Cooke III

Photography

 
Horse along Forest Reserve Road

Horse along Forest Reserve Road

Kiawe and Grasses along Kawakiu Road

Kiawe and Grasses along Kawakiu Road

Edi’s Wave

Edi’s Wave

Red Dirt Road at Puu o Hoku

Red Dirt Road at Puu o Hoku

Rainbow in the Sand at Kawa’aloa Bay

Rainbow in the Sand at Kawa’aloa Bay

View from Cave at Kalani

View from Cave at Kalani

Ohia Canopy Kamakou Preserve

Ohia Canopy Kamakou Preserve

Cliffs at Sunrise from Ka’ehu Point

Cliffs at Sunrise from Ka’ehu Point

Long Exposure at “the Bathtub”

Long Exposure at “the Bathtub”

The Wave

The Wave

 

Rikki Cooke has been a professional photographer for 40 years. For much of that time, he worked as a freelance photographer for The National Geographic Society, traveling throughout the world on a variety of assignments. His main interest is focusing on and honoring the innate beauty of his subjects. His assignments with National Geographic Society have included shooting two books: America's Ancient Cities and The Blue Ridge Range as well as photographic projects for other National Geographic publications. His many credits also include shooting the photography on Hawai'i for The Smithsonian Guides to Natural America: The Pacific Hawai'i and Alaska.

 

Rikki’s experience touches the full spectrum of photography, from lighting pyramids to photographing polar bears in the Arctic, as well as photographing national advertising campaigns for commercial clients. His digitally manipulated photographs, featured at Mānoa Gallery, reveal the often-surreal quality of land and seascapes of Hawai'i.

Rikki and his wife, Bronwyn, are the authors of the award-winning book, Molokai, an Island in Time. In the early 1990s, they moved back to Molokai—an island that was part of Rikki’s childhood. Today, they live on lands that have been in his family for 100 years, where Rikki and Bronwyn run Hui Ho'olana, a non-profit tax-exempt educational organization and arts center located on Molokai. Hui Ho'olana is dedicated to the fine art of teaching, healing the land, and inspiring its students through workshops and volunteer residencies. Hui Ho'olana is a self-sustaining facility that supports educational programs and native Hawaiian reforestation projects and provides an environment that offers a safe haven for spiritual growth and nurturing the creative spirit.

Learn about Rikkiʻs work on Molokai by visiting his website at www.rikkicooke.com.